A diamond is forever, but an expensive engagement ring means the marriage might not last that long. Men are 50 percent more likely to end up divorced when they said their partner's looks were important in their decision to get married, and women are 60 percent more likely to end up divorced when they cared about their partner’s wealth, compared to people who said they cared about neither. Honeymoons decrease the chances of divorce by 41 percent.* * *Part of the study echoes what we already know about marriage: That it's increasingly for rich people—who make a lot and can afford honeymoons.

According to a new study, spending between ,000 and ,000 on an engagement ring is significantly associated with an increase in the risk of divorce. They analyzed income, religious attendance, how important attractiveness was to each partner, wedding attendance, and other metrics to determine the aspects associated with eventual marital dissolution. Dating for a while before tying the knot might indicate a level of planning that suggests the couple is in it for the long haul.

But the other findings, like the fact that expensive rings and ceremonies don't yield happier unions, are more surprising.

Perhaps ill-matched couples use giant diamonds or flashy weddings to cover up the cracks in their emotional foundations.

Are these guys patient or just stringing them along? As it turns out, there isn’t a lot of recent research on the courtship length prior to marriage.

I get asked a lot of relationship-themed questions given where I work, and one of them is from women with boyfriends who want to know how long to wait for the ring.

These aren’t women who have been dating for two months, but rather women who are in long-term relationships.

The data scientist Randal Olson recently visualized some of the findings from a paper by Andrew Francis and Hugo Mialon, two researchers at Emory University who studied 3,000 married couples in the U. Their findings offer some take-aways for couples who want to minimize their chances of divorce: You should date for three years before popping the question. Similarly, a well-attended ceremony might be a proxy for a large family that pressures and/or supports the couple and helps them stay together.

A strong marriage, in other words, is an intentional one.

They have seemingly great mates who have jobs and call their moms and open doors to restaurants- but haven’t yet popped the question.

The relationship is traveling into their third (or sixth) year and nothing is wrong except these girls would like to take the relationship to the next level and their men have yet to agree.